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Hard Decisions – Dropping Out

As many of you will know it’s been a tough few weeks for me. Since the week of Manchester marathon I’ve been struggling with a knee injury that I just haven’t been able to overcome, no matter how hard we tried.

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It’s put me in a really bad mind set for the last few weeks, I’ve been constantly trying to get myself patched up for a race, that I’d never have given myself time to be ready for anyway. Beating myself up and rushing back to training that I shouldn’t really be doing. I need to be 100% before I start thinking about racing, not competing for the sake of it.

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I’ve been able to run and swim, although not to my full potential, and I’ve been forced to take a full 6 weeks off the bike. Only breaking the curfew to race a couple of times, making the pain worse again.

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Because of this we decided it best for me to take a complete week off training, resuming this week and holding off riding my time trial bike for another 2 weeks.

And unfortunately the first morning after my test ride my knee was back to being very sore. Due to this I won’t be racing the 70.3 I had planned tomorrow as my practice race and an attempt to qualify for the 70.3 worlds this year.

It’s sad that I won’t be able to race, although we’ve known for a couple of weeks that I wouldn’t be at my full potential. And I have to look at the bigger picture. There’ll be plenty more 70.3’s for me to enter, and I now have unfinished business here in France.

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I’ve started to realise over the last few days that life is too short to worry about these things. I’m only 23 years old. I’ve got 5 years before I even scratch the surface of these pros. And scrambling around trying to string a few little races together isn’t going to help me get there.

So I think some time off, figure out the source of the problem and get myself fully fixed is on the cards. Not rushing the recovery, so I can put together I full rebuild to hopefully save the end of the season.

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It may mean that I miss the championship, my BBAR attempt, and possibly even Ironman UK. Even if it plagues the rest of the season, that’s not ideal for any athlete, and it’s not what anybody wants to hear. But I’ll be back. I have age on my side and I know this is gonna be a long slog, so I have to keep the focus, and know that there will be a light at the end of the tunnel. And soon I’ll be back to smash through that 9:30 and 4:15 barrier respectively.

I’m hoping to rebuild the strength through my knee in the coming weeks so I can get stuck into the volume of training my mind and body love. Fitness will take time to rebuild, but it’s time I have on my side.

A big block could see me regain fitness just in time for Ironman UK mid July, provided I don’t encounter any more setbacks! But fate is a cruel mistress.

I’d like to thank my ever supportive friends & family for putting up with me and helping me realise that missing a few months of racing won’t end the world.

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Along with John Honey Physiotherapy for their fantastic work through this period to get me to the start line of races and optimising my recovery time. Hopefully we can work to get this problem solved.

If you’re local to the cheshire area they’re definitely the team for the job!

Until then, rest, recovery and rehab!

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Stay tuned over the coming weeks for a big announcement about my final 2017 sponsor.

They’re wheely good!

The Next Step – Learning To Race

New Zealand was great.

Sunny, peaceful, relaxing.

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Finally back in the UK it’s time to reflect on the positives and negatives of the trip, pass judgements and decide the next steps moving forward.

Flying out to New Zealand I had one job:

Win the age group. And therefore – qualify for Kona.

Get that golden ticket that so many people spend a life time hunting for.

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And it’s hard for me to say I had a bad race, because I didn’t. I stuck to the plan and executed the result. So when people ask me am I happy with it? Well yes, on that day that was the best I could have done.

On one side of the coin, I biked a 5:05 into the wind. However on my side of the coin I finished the swim with 500 people ahead of me. Not a place to be competitive.

I am capable of so much more. My build up let me down, I was lazy with my diet, amongst other things I wasn’t quite as disciplined and regimented as I like to be.

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And there are so many unanswered questions.

You see, that was the first time I’ve ever ‘raced’ an ironman. By which I mean, pushed on from start to finish, holding an uncomfortable intensity, attempting to go fast rather than purely see the finish line with a smile on my face.

And I learned a lot.

But now I have a whole mind of curiosities. Unanswered questions about myself. So much unfinished business with what I’m capable of.

We can start with the obvious one. A 1:23 swim leaves so much to still be desired.

And what happens if I push the swim? Race myself for the best possible time, rather than just get to my bike. Will my cycle legs still hold out? Will it bite me on the run?

And the bike leg, what happens if I swim faster and get myself into a strong group? Could we use the 12m legal zone to gain 5-10 minutes? Maybe even more.

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My 3:28 marathon was solid, the proudest part of my race. That’s what won the age group for me and running it home down that finishing shoot is a feeling that will get me through a lot of hard sessions in the coming months.

But the medics weighed me at 83kg before the race, and I’ve only been running 6 months. So what can I run at 75kg? What’s my real race weight? Can I push a 3 hour with more training and more resilience? Can my transitions be quicker? Is my nutrition right? Can I handle more caffeine? A new bike position? Better prep? No niggles?

All of these things flying round in my head, and the real answer to a lot of them, is unknown.

But now. In my 3rd season in the sport I’m in the position where Im ready to learn. I can afford to attack races, make mistakes. Fall down, break, push myself too far.

I have to remember that this time last year I’d just started back after 6 months off. And it’d still be another 3 months before I managed to run anything over 5k. So I have a lot of progression still to come.

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It’s time to step it up, and try to begin the transition from a good age grouper, to a seriously competitive one.

And build up the pieces, create the jigsaw of the ‘perfect race’.

I may never find the perfect combination of speed and efficiency, I may never string together a flawless race. But the more mistakes I make, and the closer I get. The faster I’ll become.

And it won’t happen overnight, it’ll be a long journey, a tough process. Nobody likes losing, giving everything and it just not being good enough. A deflating feeling.

But you can’t win every time, and every time you lose it makes you that bit more resilient.

So my next big race is in 4 months time at ironman UK. Everything else will be used as a warm up, a test, an experiment.

I’ll be racing everything I can find from park runs, time trials, duathlons and triathlon. Of all distances, testing myself to work out what I am really capable of.

And as always, the most important part – don’t get injured.

July 14th. Ironman UK.

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See you there.

World Champs – “But it’s only Age Group”

I’m very excited with the news that despite missing out on Kona this year by 90 seconds, I’ll be able to race a world championships anyway. An opportunity that will only boost my racing character and add invaluable world championship experience. A different time zone, different weather and the classic hotel accommodation will all be experiences helping me get used to big races in the future.


Qualifying for long distance World’s in Oklahoma with my time in Wales and middle distance from my Cotswold Classic time. A 4:20 half and a top 100 finish in Wales made for a comfortable qualification, with a lot of work to do this year.

Qualifying through the British Triathlon system is an interesting one, you have to be within 115% of the winning AG time to qualify. An easy feat some might say, however if this is the case, why isn’t everyone racing for GB?

One of the most common phrases in amateur triathlon. They’re a GB athlete… yeah but ‘it’s only age group’. But unless you’re in the Olympic team, there are no other GB teams outside of age group.

Oh… Yeah.

Hadn’t thought of that had you?



Well for a start any stash with the words GBR followed by your surname should never ever be turned down. Ever. And secondly, to qualify for Kona you don’t have to be too far off the times achieved for an age-group athlete going to ITU’s.

Granted it doesn’t hold the same prestige as Kona, or the same prize money, but even the elite triathletes race ITU and Challenge events for race experience, prize money and to keep the sponsors happy. Having just attained sponsors for 2016 that will be helping me through my path to World and European championships this summer I am already starting to feel the heat.


4 months off with injury and no heavy training on the cards any time soon it’s a struggle to see myself in any form for the coming season. Although that doesn’t matter, because it’s only age group right?

Although there is no team outside of age group for long or middle distance, thus making it impossible to represent the country in other ways at these events? Jan Frodeno the world champion doesn’t race for Germany, he represents Canyon, Aspics, 2xu and his other sponsors. So this is the perfect stepping stone for gaining sponsorship, experiencing races and keeping the dream alive.

So how is it possible to be anything other than ‘only age group’ if you want to represent your country?

It’s not!


I will also be racing for sponsors, and luckily my sponsors will be helping me with the financial side of racing, but is it not everyones dream to represent their country in some way? And unless you’re an olympic athlete, this is rather hard to do, especially for those of us who are made for them slow twitch gains.

Personally holding the dream of one day holding a pro card, I’m not too worried about the stepping stones to bigger things. Being able to cycle 240km at over 33kph, being able to run a half marathon sub 1:23, and slowly but surely getting there in the pool, I’d thoroughly enjoy a race with any amateur turning their noses up at age group athletes, however even if you’re .01% under that cut off, and take one of the last team spots, take the chance, buy the kit, do yourself proud.